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2010 Top 10: #7 Mr. McRae’s Class Voicethreads! & #8 Ms. Manti’s Class Google Docs!

June 15, 2010

#7 Mr. McRae’s Class Voicethreads (Documentary Video)

Take a look at the size of the tag Mr. McRae’s Class 09-10 in the tag cloud on the lower right, and you’ll realize just how much work his class published to the Internet!  169 posts this year and counting!  They are in the top 10 for more than just volume — Mr. McRae’s integrated technology into the writing process in a way that had students building technology skills and media literacy, while learning what makes good writing.  Watch him and his students explain how they wrote, typed, and produced videos throughout the year in this documentary video:

[blip.tv ?posts_id=3775067&dest=-1]

Bonus Clip: Also watch Jesse explain her class’ Web Publishing & Reflection process:

[blip.tv ?posts_id=3775366&dest=-1]

#8 Ms. Manti’s Class Google Docs Essays

Mr. McRae’s students would not be the producers they are, without the groundwork laid by 2nd-grade teachers building fundamental computer and typing skills.  Ms. Manti’s class worked on keyboarding skills through Dance Mat Typing, then on becoming proficient with laptops, and finally being able to log in to Google Docs on their own to type their fiction stories, and add images from the Internet to support their writing.  They are now ready for publishing work in 3rd grade!  Here’s a sample from one of Ms. Manti’s star students, who by the way, just learned English last year!:

The Monsters in the Mist, by Joshua, Class 2-208

Monsters in the Mist, by Joshua (Google Doc)

Monsters in the Mist, by Joshua (Google Doc)

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. Shawn permalink
    June 15, 2010 8:28 pm

    I love the work being done with students and the level of engagement it brings. With respect to the technologies used, how have you navigated around the TOU of some sites, which stipulate that users must be older than 13 or even 18?

    thanks

  2. June 16, 2010 10:25 pm

    PS 124 says “Thanks Shawn!” All work the youngsters are doing is within shared accounts that the teachers are administering, and they monitor all of the student action and follow the NYCDOE acceptable use policy — publishing work with first names only and without personal info about the kids.

    More to come!

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